Bottle

[Review] Bottle (2016)

It’s been a couple of months since I played a game. In this time I had some upgrades installed in the ol’ PC that required a total wipe of my hard drive. Although some might find this bothersome, I always see some opportunities in starting fresh. So, I took some time to set up the computer how I like it, and this week, I felt like playing something. I decided to break ‘er in with Bottle, a very simplistic walking simulator.

You are a solitary man living in a cabin in the woods in the dead of winter. In the first scene you hear a cork pop and liquid pouring into a glass. You open your eyes, and immediately walk around collecting notes from someone presumed to be your loved one, and by the tone of the notes, you can deduce they are no longer with us. You travel through the woods, following a path and encounter apparitions of your loved one. She says nonsense and then vanishes. You also encounter deer. Sooner or later you encounter a monument, a hollowed-out church and more notes in broken English. The game then abruptly ends with confusing finality.

Bottle was created by Tonguc Bodur, a developer known for creating Drizzlepath, another walking simulator that is sitting in my Steam Library. This game was cheap – I paid a buck – and it’s also short, concluding after an hour with no save point. Bottle forces you to play the entire game in one sitting.

The controls in Bottle are simplistic, using the keyboard WASD keys to move, and the mouse for direction. I got to hand it to Bodur: the graphics are ambitious – beautiful – but, at times they were confusing. As a gamer, you are often searching for visual cues that signal an area that needs to be checked out or interacted with, and often this comes in the form of twinkling objects or areas. In Bottle, every rock and tree top shimmered, making me think every hemlock and boulder needed attention, when all it was was sunlight on snow.

Glowing Orbs

There are also similarities to Everybody’s Gone to the Rapture in golden orbs of light that appear a few times in the game; I am assuming these indicate where the dead once were, but can’t be sure. Nothing much happened for me when they appeared except a crescendo of piano music. There is also a “Bottle Dark” feature in the game that allows you to play Bottle at night; it’s the same game but you travel by the light of the moon.

Bottle Dark

The objects you interact with are few and far between in Bottle; aside from collecting notes, there was your overcoat and an axe you are allowed to touch once. The deer don’t move when you walk up to them and there isn’t much else to interact with. There are some unsettling moments in Bottle, especially when you are alone and see apparitions, or hear the noises of the wind and wildlife filling the soundtrack, but the feelings quickly pass. After 30 minutes of the same I asked myself what more there was to all of this. It’s an afternoon trek through a wintry forest where the enjoyment is supposed to be in walking around.

If you are looking for a juicy plot, Bottle is not your game. I found it mostly dry in the plot department; I couldn’t see the point to any of it. If you are looking for an hour trek through a pretty simulated forest, this is what you are looking for. Don’t expect much else though.

2/5

Bottle
Tonguc Bodur
2016

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