Author: Sarca

I write, I game, I knit, I watch, I mainline coffee.

[Review] Lifeless Planet (2014) (PC)

An astronaut on a mission crash lands on a mysterious planet, loses his crew and wanders around trying to figure out where he is and if there is any life. This is complicated by the fact he has limited oxygen and must frequently find oxygen outlets and tanks around the planet. The landscape has a varied ecology, with desert, mountains, and greenery. He soon discovers utility poles on the horizon, which lead him to a tiny abandoned Russian outpost. He finds clues that at one point this planet was manned by Scientists from the Soviet Union but something bad happened. The astronaut thinks he is the last being on this Lifeless Planet…but then suddenly he isn’t so sure…

Lifeless Planet is a puzzle platformer that is pretty open-world. At first blush, I liked the look of this game. The astronaut reminded me a lot of an animated version of the MTV fella. The planet he explores was well rendered and I did feel a sense of foreboding with its empty landscapes. The premise of Lifeless Planet was also interesting enough to keep me going for over six hours. Maybe it was my endurance, or maybe my stubbornness, because this game has long stretches where nothing at all happens with one or two things that do blow your mind.

Let me tell you though, the gameplay to Lifeless Planet left a lot to be desired. You wander this astronaut around the planet using your mouse and keyboard, and overall, it’s a pretty frustrating and uncomfortable experience. The options menu was very pared down (at least in the PC version), with not much in the way of customization. This isn’t a problem if the developers make things easy on the gamer, but unfortunately that wasn’t my experience with this game. Try navigating your little astronaut around and have the perspective change on a dime from being able to see your astronaut far away, to an extreme close-up of the back of his head. Who can play a game like that? The gameplay was a pretty nauseating experience as a result. Open-world games can make my stomach flip at the best of times, especially if there is no option to add a cross-hair to the centre of my screen to help curb my stomach-flipping, and that option was not there in this game.

Lastly, the safe points in Lifeless Planet were false! I’d reach a safe point…or so I thought. Every time I’d return to the game, I would be sent back to the start of another level; I’d never start at a safe point. This was not just some odd glitch – this happened most of the time! And after the six hours of gameplay, with no progression in the storyline, and after repeating a level for the third time, my patience ran thin. I decided there was more excitement on my own planet, and walked away from Lifeless Planet. So it goes.

The game is available on PC, OSX, PS4 and Xbox One. Hope you have an better time than I did!

2.5/5

Lifeless Planet (PC)
Stage 2 Studios
2014

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[Music] Andrew Cash – Time and Place

I SCORED a Master Grail list item!!

Surprise, everyone! I am happy to announce that on one of my initial CD forages, I found an album that I have been searching for a LONG TIME: Andrew Cash’s Time and Place!

I would be shocked if anyone knows anything about this very talented Canadian recording artist outside of Canada. But, Andrew Cash was all over the radio in 1988-1994 in Ontario, even in my Northern town (thanks, Can-con!). He was also on Much Music quite a bit. His music made a lasting impression on me in the dark recesses of my mind.

My hunt for this album started as an exploration for a source of an earworm I had picking my brains back in the early 2000s. Back then, it was a conversation with a friend of mine about 80s music. In the era of Napster, I searched and found a lot of 80s music, and feverishly burned CDs to add to my piddly 80s CD music collection. Our conversation turned to obscure music we heard on the radio from back in the day, when we spent an evening using each other like a human Shazam, singing each other excerpts of songs that were swirling in our heads in the hopes the other would recognize it and say, “Oh, that song is X by Y”.

I sang, “I-go o-ver my sho-houlder…hee- hum you sa-a-a-aid…” Ha, I didn’t give her much to go on…and there weren’t any lyric websites like what we have today. Needless to say, she couldn’t get to the bottom of the earworm.

It was randomly one day around 2010, when a radio station played the source of my years-long earworm: Smile Me Down by Andrew Cash. Riiight! I thought. I remember that name! Not Johnny Cash, not Roseanne Cash, but Andrew Cash (no relation!). I took to the Goggles searching for Andrew Cash music anything – videos, info…anything! It was scant. A Torontonian, Andrew Cash played in a band called Etranger with fellow musician Charlie Angus in 1980 before pursuing a Solo career. Time and Place was released in 1988, which had some success in Canada. Cash later released Boomtown (another one I am searching for on CD. I do have the cassette format version, thanks to a care package courtesy of Aaron from keepsmealiveread about that here), as well as Hi in 1993. After that, Cash sort of fell off my radar. But, as it turns out, he has been quite busy, continuing to perform, even forming the Cash Brothers with Skydiggers’ alum (and his sibling), Peter Cash, as well as having a stint in Federal politics (as did Charlie Angus).

Andrew Cash has been holding his musical property close, not allowing iTunes and Google Play to sell most of his music, nor having a Vevo account on YouTube.  Thankfully, some rogue YouTubers have posted some grainy Much Music videos from back in the day. A few years ago, I wound up happily paying for the .MP3 of the song, Time and Place, via his website; a transaction he thanked me for personally via email. The desire for the full physical album never abated, so when Aaron from keepsmealive asked people to crowdsource their music wishlists via the Master Grail List, I added Andrew Cash’s first two albums. I am also a bit of a hunter on the cheap, so I could search for wanted items via used CD sites and find what I’m looking for…or I could search and find what I want inexpensively. In my case, I found Time and Place for $1.00 at a junk shop in Whitby. As Bop puts it: BAMMMM! GRAIL GOAL ACHIEVED!

Time and Place is a rock album with acoustic elements and thoughtful lyrics. The listener is drawn into upbeat ditties with pensive messages that touch on life: the insecurities of ageing, mental health, a mother’s grief… There is a simplicity and earthy feel to the album – guitar, bass, viola, harmonica and drums, you feel right at home listening to this album.

The first hasty strums of an electric guitar begin the first song on the album (and source of my earworm) Smile Me Down; an effective starter. The chorus goes a little differently than what I remember:

“I-go o-ver my sho-houlder…hee- hum you sa-a-a-aid…” is actually,

“I look over my shoulder, hearing you say we’re older now.” Oh well, I almost remembered!

The other track I am familiar with, Time and Place, is one I would unabashedly sing along to in the car at 13, while my sister drove us around, embarrassed I was singing along to some old “fogey”.  At a time when INXS and George Michael were burning up the charts and competing for my attention, this song was one that had a memorable melody and was just lovely to sing to. I know Cash was being ignored by my contemporaries, but I was paying attention. And now, as an old fogey myself (ha!) I am elated to add Andrew Cash’s Time and Place to my music collection, and was not the least bit disappointed in it.

Listen for yourself:

(Smile Me Down at 0:00; Time and Place at 9:50)

[Music] The Catch and Release for September 2017

As many of you know from last week’s post, I have started to reconnect with my music collection, as well as acquire choice CDs to add to my collection. I have listened to / owned some of these albums in the past, but I have also chosen to explore some new-to-me artists.

This series –  The Catch and Release – showcases a choice sample of these finds from the past month; some of these albums I’ve “caught” will happily be part of my collection forever. But, there are albums that I acquired on a lark, that upon a listen or two have not resounded with me, which I have chosen to release back in the wild.

Here we go!

This past month, I made the decision to add some female musicians to my pretty male-dominated CD collection…I had some success and some failure…

The Catch

Sarah McLachlan – Touch (1989)

This charming album by Canadian songstress, Sarah McLachlan, has always been on my want list…even back in 1989 when her hit, Vox, was rising on the charts. I first watched McLachlan’s music video on Much Music and was instantly taken in by her angelic voice and awesome dangly earrings. Aside from the two of us sharing a first name (including the “h”, thankyouverymuch), I couldn’t help but get drawn in by her stylings at the time there were so few female Canadian artists doing what she was doing. It might have been the same day when my friend, Jenny B, and I went downtown to the local record shops in Sudbury to search for Sarah McLachlan. Alas, Sudbury, Ontario was an underserved music hub in 1989, and her album was very difficult to find…and it was expensive to buy elsewhere. I had to settle for Jenny B’s cassette recording off of Much Music via cable radio so I could listen to the song in any capacity.

Fastforward to this past month when I found this album on my travels for $2.99. And – thank goodness – my instincts were right…I was not the least bit disappointed, by any of it! This debut showcases her opera stylings, which might be a little too classical for some, but I think it’s a great listen. Hits: Vox, Steaming, Ben’s Song.

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Bonnie Raitt – Nick of Time (1989)

It was a trip to my local grocery store about 10 years ago when I first heard the song, Nick of Time, play over the PA. It hooked me in right away, especially the lyrics that concern the big questions of life – getting married, having children, growing old, and running out of time to do all of it. Bonnie has her slide guitar on the pulse of life. Each song is rich with warm pure sound. And Bonnie’s voice – wow! This is my first Raitt CD, and it definitely won’t be my last. By the way, this also has her other mega hits: Thing Called Love, Have a Heart.

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Sass Jordan – Racine (1988)

I must have been asleep when Sass Jordan’s music was making a dent on the radio. I was not paying any attention to her albums at all. I knew she had a string of hits, and I know her from her work with the Montreal band the Box. When I found her album, Racine, on my travels, I decided to give Sass a try – hey, she’s female, she’s Canadian. Well, Holee Sheeeitt! Jordan has some set of smokin pipes, yo! People have compared her stylings to the Black Crowes, and that must be why I loved this album so much. It’s rockin! \m/
Familiar hits: Make You a Believer, I Want to Believe, Go’in Back Again.

The Release

TLC – Fanmail (1999)

I never owned anything by TLC back in the day, but I do love that Waterfalls song. This Hip Hop album happens to have three “hits” I recognize – Silly Ho, No Scrubs and Unpretty. I am not the biggest Hip Hop fan that ever there was, but when done well, I can certainly get behind it. Fanmail is very Hip Hop, utilizing loops, samples and scratches throughout – and not well in a lot of cases. Try listening to a song with a half-time buzzer on a constant loop? I was about ready to stab my ears out! I do like that No scrubs song though, but not worth keeping an album for one song.

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Garbage – S/T (1995)

When Garbage broke out on the scene, I enjoyed Stupid Girl. I didn’t really follow the band’s career back in ’95 (too busy following the Watchmen’s career!). It was the first time listening to this self-titled album, and I was surprised – and not in a positive way. Some might like this album for the liquid adrenaline dripping from the speakers on every track…points for consistency, but I needed a breather.

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Exposé – Exposure (1990)

This trio had a string of hits in the 80s, including Point of No Return, Seasons Change and Come Go With Me. So, when I found this at the Mission thrift store for $0.50, why the heck not? Exposure, a greatest hits album has included these hits; the other 7 songs on the album are not familiar, no that great and oh so 80s….I never thought I’d say this out loud but some albums can be too 80s, even for Sarca (the hubs almost had a heart attack when I muttered that sentence…)! Yeah, it’s a pass…

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In conclusion, not too shabby this month. I am trying to be selective, and not just keeping something for the sake of it. I am still enjoying this experience. We shall see what next month will bring…

 

[TV] The Sinner (2017)

Cora Tannetti, house wife and mother to a young son, has just been arrested for murder. No one is disputing the fact that she committed the act; all the sunbathers at the beach she was at witnessed her spontaneously jump the guy the next beach blanket over, stabbing him repeatedly with the paring knife she had been using to slice a pear only a minute ago.

Lately, Cora has been experiencing some weird flashes of memory, almost like a dream. She isn’t sure where they are coming from, nor what they mean…a blurred vision of someone wearing a balaclava, soft bare skin, odd wallpaper, and flashbacks to her childhood growing up with an ailing sister, and religious parents. The reason for her sudden act of violence eludes her. She doesn’t understand why she did what she did. The police are investigating and discover she knew the victim – a guy from her past, named Frankie – but relationship details about him are out of reach to her, like that month of her life had been completely erased. She has evidence of drug abuse thanks to scars on her arms, but doesn’t recall taking drugs. And there’s that electronic dance music that was playing on the beach that day, the same music the detective on the case, Harry Ambrose, decided to play for Cora the day of her arrest, that triggered her into a dizzied rage, that resulted in her assaulting Ambrose. Although the Police have their woman, and should have an open and shut case of Capital Murder, Ambrose thinks there is more to this than meet the eye, and there ensues quite a deep dive into Cora’s past to discover what these suppressed memories were all about.


The Sinner
is an 8-part mini-series that originally aired on USA channel, and of this post, there are two episodes left to air on Showcase in Canada. Jessica Biel plays Cora, and let me tell you, it’s been a long time since she was Mary Camden on 7th Heaven! Biel’s flawless performance really makes this show something to see. She is also ageless, and at age 35, is still able to get away with playing a 19-year-old! (Looks like that L’Oreal contract is working in her favor!) A haggard-looking Bill Pullman plays Ambrose, the detective with some personal and disturbing demons himself who tries to navigate Cora through her suppressed memories to get to the truth.

I’ll be honest. After the third episode of the Sinner, I felt like something was disingenuous. I understand this is a work of fiction, but still, I’ve watched enough detective shows to know that the number one interest the cops have is finding the person responsible for the crime, and closing the case. Cora’s case almost got to that point until Ambrose cut in. His colleagues at the cop shop, the judge on the case, even Cora asked why he was going to the lengths he was going to find out what happened. He said he didn’t think she did it with malice intent. I hung in despite this shortcoming, and I am glad I did. The show turned out so good – so suspenseful in fact, last night I downloaded the last two episodes to watch them instead of waiting until next week for Showcase to air the next episode. The Sinner twists and turns in areas you will never expect to a satisfying conclusion. Highly recommend!

4/5

The Sinner
Starring Jessica Biel and Bill Pullman
2017

Just When I Thought I Was Out, The Music Pulls Me Back In…

I have had a hankering to listen to some tunes from my collection of CDs for a long while now. I never realized it would be such a big deal, but when you store your collection in large Rubbermaid containers, it can become a pain. To pull out the ol’ bin from the dark corner of the basement seemed like a very daunting task. Overwhelming, in fact:

So much good music in this bin, but it weighs a ton…and…oh man, forget it. I’ll just listen to music on YouTube…

When my iPod went belly-up two years ago, at the time I said to myself I was going to do something with those CDs once and for all. Rip ’em onto the terabyte so I could reacquaint myself with them. Well, it hasn’t happened, folks. For years, we have been concentrating on gaming and house renos – putting the CDs away, favouring instead other avenues to get music – Sirius Satellite radio, online streaming services like Google, Groove Music and Accuradio – and plain ol’ .mp3s fulfilled the need. Whenever I’d think of reacquainting myself with the CDs, the thought of moving around furniture again to make room to display them seemed impossible.

It was one Sunday in August when the hubs and I were at the mall on the hunt for the game Spot It (highly recommend!) when he said he wanted to go into Sunrise Records. Understand, we don’t do the mall. The last time we stepped foot in a mall was back in March when coincidentally, HMV, the only record store for miles was closing its doors. Sunrise has since opened in its place, and this August was the first time we checked it out. I haven’t bought physical music in a long while (I purchased Man Machine Poem by the Tragically Hip last fall).

Honestly, I have been out of the CD-buying game for a LONG TIME! I have been gleefully watching from the sidelines as Mike, Bop, Aaron, Geoff, Deke, 1537, J., JHubner73 (see blogroll for a who’s who), and the rest of you great music bloggers search, buy and review music. I haven’t bought music on a regular basis in years, partly because of my own self-imposed austerity, partly because of gaming, partly because of the wave of digital media, and well, I seem to get overwhelmed with the amount of stuff that accumulates versus the lack of time and energy to enjoy it. I have written on this blog how music changes my mood; it inspires, it entertains! And I have been feeling like I need to connect with my music again! So when we set foot into Sunrise, I found myself perusing the racks. And you wouldn’t believe what I found:

What?! U2’s The Joshua Tree, remastered!?!

I was in awe. The hubs said, “Well, that’s it, I don’t care what you say, we’re buying it.” Boy, am I glad we did.

The reissue was crisp-sounding, and since I hadn’t heard the Joshua Tree album in a long while, it was fun getting reacquainted with all of those songs. It brought me back to 1987 when Where The Streets Have No Name was hitting the charts. The first half of the album is well known to radio, while it’s also the last half – Trip Through Your Wires, In God’s Country, One Tree Hill, Mothers of the Disappeared – that I love the most. Yes, this is good! Yes, it inspired me.

Following that trip, the hubs and I have since pulled out our three bins of CDs, alphabetized them, and catalogued them using Discogs. Now, I am looking at my current collection more critically.

Lotsa CD-Rs…

Not so amazingly, when we went through the collection, we discovered at least 1/3 of it is burned CDs created from downloading! Looking back, I can’t believe how much effort went into downloading, printing covers and burning the CDs – a whole large Rubbermaid container full! Granted, some of the music were bootlegs or hard-to-find collections, but certainly not all of it! I couldn’t help but feel a bit of guilt.

I have started to legitimize my collection by acquiring the actual physical media of my favourite albums. My preference in media is for the CD (more accessible to me – I can listen to it in the car!), while the hubs is getting the vinyl fever (natch!). Regardless, if there is a remaster available on an album of interest, I will certainly consider that purchase. The ones I have purchased lately have been worth it.

The Majesty!

This newfound interest in my music collection has led me to explore some albums that eluded me back in the day. While I can freely peruse the stacks at Sunrise, the thriftin’ bug also catches my attention. What with CDs as little as $0.50 to $2.99 at the junk shops and used media stores, I have managed to gain some headway on this front, quite cheaply. Many people are dumping out of their physical media, which works out great for me. I’ve been using my two-hour daily commute to my advantage too, by taking my music spoils for a spin in the car and have discovered some really awesome new-to-me albums…and I have also found some no-so-great albums…which I can cast aside, guilt free!

I hope to talk more about my love for the tunes here on the blog. For now, I am just really enjoying this experience.

[Review] Adam Wolfe (2016) (PC)

This past Spring, I picked up the game Adam Wolfe on a Steam sale. At first glance, what immediately struck me was how similar this game’s name was to a favourite game of mine:

Familiar? Yes, indeed; in appearance, and in initials (A.W.)! And the similarities go further – both games use aspects of the paranormal in their story. (Both A.W.s are different in genre, however: Alan Wake being more on the survival horror spectrum, while Adam Wolfe is hidden object adventure).

More to the point, the paranormal as a plot device in games is a familiar one. Adventure games in particular have used it repeatedly. I am quite familiar with it having played games like Angelica Weaver: Catch Me When You Can, and Shiver: Vanishing Hitchhiker, among many more. Some gaming studios have taken the device to dead horse flogging territory, using it over and over again (looking atchu, Big Fish Games…). You would think by now I would avoid games like this… but there was just something about Adam Wolfe that pulled me in.

Adam Wolfe is a paranormal investigator with the San Francisco Police Department, responsible for cases that are too “out there” for run-of-the-mill detective work. First order of business is to chase down a firebug who is wrecking havoc in the Bay area. He mantracks the perp and discovers there is something supernatural about the dude.

In this scene, the perp just melts on screen – literally!

Meanwhile, Adam’s sister mysteriously goes missing, and he soon discovers the firebug case he is investigating and his sister’s disappearance are interrelated. This leads Adam into the seedy underbelly of San Francisco, face to face with a strange cult whose leader claims he has the secret to eternal life on Earth. Along the way, Adam discovers a watch that allows him the ability to turn back time to a period when crimes took place; helpful to Adam who uses it in his investigation to get a better grasp of what happened. Using a cellphone, he is able to GPS his way around the city, and call his partner, Marv, back at the station, for information needed to further his investigation.

Over the four-part game, Adam Wolfe draws you into an intriguing story that infuses suspense and horror into the plot successfully.  There are indeed some scary moments in the game that made me jump out of my seat, which isn’t normally expected in a hidden object game. Granted, the plot devices of missing relatives, turning back time, and the supernatural is totally cliched in hidden object adventure games, but I forgive Adam Wolfe as there are bigger standouts that trump the negatives. For one, the quality of the graphics in this game are unparalleled when compared to other hidden object games I have played as of late.  The gameplay is taut and the puzzles are varied and challenging, including clear-picture hidden object scenes, and picture scrambles. Most interesting is the game gives opportunities to be a part of Adam’s police work: take crime scene samples, shoot Adam’s gun, beat up perps with fists, and drive Adam’s motorcycle through the streets of San Francisco…all in a day’s work!

Having played dozens of hidden object games in my life, Adam Wolfe is one of the better hidden object adventure games going, and is definitely worth your attention. Available on PC, Mac. iOS and Android, I highly recommend you pick this one up.

4.5/5

Adam Wolfe (PC)
MadHead Games
2016

[Film] On an Endless Loop: Heavenly Bodies (1985)

Have you ever had one of those memory flashes triggered by something – music…a film…even a commercial where you see it or hear it and all of the sudden you recall a film from a long time ago…but the name eludes you…It’s driving you crazy…until the answer arrives when you least expect it?

In 1985 I loved nothing more than to dance around to music (the hubs would say I still do – ha!). My sis and I would come up with faux dance routines, and sing along like we were rock stars on MTV. My mom had decided that September 1985 was time to put this energy and interest to use. Aside from having our necessary weekly piano lessons, we took dance classes – Jazz to be precise. I took dance consistently for years well into high school until school work and jobs competed for my time and energy. I really did enjoy that time I took jazz and learned a lot about physical balance, coordination and timing – big things for me as I can be unsteady on my feet. I always wished I was good at team sports, but I just…am not. Dancing, however, was fun and physical, and in my own way, I was being sporty…with jazz hands.

Back in the 80s, Jazzercise as a theme was a big thing in films (see Flashdance, Staying Alive, Perfect, Dirty Dancing…). There was a succession of dance-themed films, and I knew about all of them. If there was dancing in a movie, I was watching it. Time has faded the memory of these films to a certain extent, however…until one of them caught my eye in my satellite guide recently… and those memories came flooding back.

Anyone remember a little Canadian movie called Heavenly Bodies from 1985? This gem used to air on Canadian TV so often from ’85 to ’88 that the dialogue, music and scenes of this film were burned into my brain. I couldn’t tell you if it was a movie channel I originally watched this on, or just plain old Canadian network TV Can Con fare, but regardless there was a time it seemed to be on every month, and I would catch it every time.

Samantha and her friends are dance fanatics working the day-job grind in gritty 1985 downtown Toronto. They have met their limit with their secretarial jobs and decide to quit. They find an old warehouse to rent, and open their own Jazzercise studio they name Heavenly Bodies. The place gains media attention as the hot new “it” aerobics studio; everyone is going, and Sam and her pals are watching the cheques come rolling in. Business is great, which is drawing ire from the big boss of the big hot-shot fitness club in town that used to have the curb on the workout market. Now his patrons are choosing to spend their dollars at Heavenly Bodies instead.

Sam, the main instructor in the studio, is a lifelong dancer, and has endless energy to jazzercise all day. Believing in her abilities, her friends encourage her to audition for the top spot on a new TV fitness program pilot. She is soon picked as host above a number of contenders, including the hot shot fitness club owner’s girlfriend. Her success irritates him and his jealous girl enough to threaten Sam to shut down Heavenly Bodies…and he can do it because he owns the property on which Sam’s studio sits! In typical fashion, no 80s dance movie would be complete without duelling fitness clubs having a danceathon, and Heavenly Bodies does not disappoint.

Heavenly Bodies is true 80s in style and soundtrack. Plenty of flammable leotard and leg warmers here! Some might say Heavenly Bodies is for mature audiences…for sure, when we are talking about people barely dressed, you will have the camera panning a little too long on some areas of the human anatomy, and no one sex was spared. I would also be remiss if I didn’t mention other social factors addressed in this film, such as Sam being a single mom, and there being some surprising violent scenes that were impressionable on me as a kid. Being raised by a single parent, I could easily connect with Sam’s struggles raising a young boy alone. Thankfully, the violence bit never came into play at my house growing up.

Aside from the themes of sexuality and violence, there is something sweet and hopeful about Heavenly Bodies‘ story. The “dream come true” shallow easiness of the plot is appealing. With so many dance-themed movies at the time, it’s easy to draw comparisons between this film and Flashdance (another great film). But, what sets Heavenly Bodies apart from Flashdance is Canadian actress Cynthia Dale who played Samantha. Unlike Jennifer Beals who in Flashdance, had a double for most of her dance scenes (using cut shots of moving legs and her sweaty face to make it appear like it was her dancing…). Dale is a trained dancer who did ALL of her own dance scenes and stunts, and did them WELL, might I add. That girl worked her ass off for this film and gets kudos from me today. Even at age 11, she earned my respect: She could grand jeté, plié and spot turn anyone under the table – and I wanted to dance just like her.

The music is something that I definitely remember from my childhood. It’s not all good, let’s be honest. One song by the Sparks called, “Breaking Out of Prison, Baby” is pretty bad, and is unfortunately played several times in the film. Other artists, such as the Tubes (known for “She’s a Beauty”) and Gary Wright (“Dreamweaver” fame), also make an appearance. Of note is a song by Toronto New Wave band, Boys Brigade, whose song “Into the Flow” is probably the best song on the soundtrack. A little known fact about this song: it was produced by non other than Geddy Lee! You can sample the soundtrack here.

Heavenly Bodies is quite a rarity. I haven’t been successful in finding it anywhere for sale on DVD, to download or to stream (at least in Canada). Hollywood Suite (a Canadian movie network) seems to have an old VHS copy they must have pulled out of the dumpster somewhere as that print they aired is pretty darned gnarly. I’d love to find this cleaned up for sale somewhere. For now, I’ll have to settle for the recording of Heavenly Bodies on my PVR. Heavenly Bodies is for sure a hidden gem that brought up some great memories in me. If you are Canadian and subscribe to Hollywood Suite on Satellite or cable, be sure to check this blast from the past!

Heavenly Bodies
Starring Cynthia Dale
1985